False Teachings in the Church

There are false teachings in the churches today. We can only discern them when we seek God and submit ourselves to his ways.

If my people, who are called by my name, will humble themselves, and pray, and seek my face, and turn from their wicked ways; then I will hear from heaven, and I will forgive their sins and heal their land. 2 Chronicles 7:14

As believers we war against principalities and powers and spiritual wickedness in high places.* We pull down spiritual strongholds. We cast out demons. We heal the sick. We declare the kingdom of God. We shine a light in the darkness. We expose sin.

Today we commemorate the death of Christ. There were false teachings among the believers in Jesus’ day, as well, and the religious leaders were the ones who incited the mob to demand that Jesus be crucified. Jesus, who cast out demons, who healed the sick, who proclaimed the kingdom of God, who never did any evil or harmed anyone. If that is not enough evidence that we are at war against evil forces, then there is nothing that will convince us.

A very strange thing is happening in the world today. We are seeing death on every side as a result of the coronavirus. People are helpless in the face of this tragedy. We are also seeing economic hardship as businesses are shut down to prevent the disease from spreading. Even places of worship are closed.

In the past decade there has been a renewed interest in “spirituality” as a significant aspect of people’s lives. “Meditation” has become increasingly popular. However, there is extreme care taken not to specify the object of this faith. Supposedly it can be applied in any direction with the same result. Well, this is not true. My prayers will only be as effective as the power of the one to whom they are directed. Apart from this, the outcome is left to chance, or to evil and deceptive forces eager to participate in our undiscerning spirituality and meditation. While a lot of good can come from positive thoughts and actions, we are still left to decide whether we will choose to honor and worship a holy God, and follow his ways, or limit ourselves to our own understanding and refuse to acknowledge the designer of our universe and the forgiver of our sins.

The Rev. Bill M. Ferg stated the following in his book Every Believer’s Authority (1995): You and I are the greatest problem that satan has on the earth.

Satan has a problem with the believer. He had a problem with Jesus too. He succeeded in nailing him to the cross. When we confront heresy in the church, the response is often to try to nail us to the cross, in the sense that every effort is made to effectively silence our voice. But truth will not be silenced.

Some errors within the church are more serious and have more dire consequences than others. There is still value in gathering with believers, and we are exhorted not to forsake going to church. But let’s not be gullible and accept false teachings.

As a young teen I was part of a church that erred in its teaching. I turned to my Bible to find the truth. Eventually I found another church with a fuller understanding of the Bible. I experienced a great renewal and blessing in this church.

The errors of churches include distortion of Scripture, over-emphasis of certain teachings, exclusion of other teachings as irrelevant, adding to what the Bible teaches, changing the meaning, or being indifferent.

Even Jesus was frustrated over what he saw happening in the temple. He declared, “My house shall be called a house of prayer, but you have made it a den of robbers.” Greed had corrupted the house of God. We also see in the book of Revelation that God rebukes churches and requires that they change.

God is a God of mercy and grace, but he is also a God of wrath against men who hold the truth in unrighteousness. God hates sin. He who gave his own son to die for the forgiveness of the sins of the world will not in turn tolerate sin in the believer. Believers have lost their authority because they have rationalized that they can still harbor sin.

Psalm 103:3 says, “I will set no evil thing before my eyes.” The Bible admonishes us to be holy as God is holy. We are also not to think of ourselves as beyond temptation. If we are trying to help someone who is struggling there is the likelihood that we too could falter and fail. For this reason we walk in humility. Our susceptibility teaches us to have compassion for others. Jesus had compassion too, but he did not have tolerance for sin. In fact, he came to “destroy the works of the evil one.” (1 John 3:8) Sin is the work of the evil one.

God is purifying his church. He is preparing a bride. This is the symbolism used in the Bible for the church joining Christ for eternity. He is looking for a holy church, without spot or wrinkle.

The church does a disservice to believers when it fails to teach about the undeniable significance of being Christ-like in every respect. We are seated in the heavenly realms with Christ, having all dominion along with him. All authority is given to us as believers, along with Christ, when we walk in his will.*

Our Father, who art in heaven, Hallowed be thy name. Thy kingdom come. Thy will be done on earth as it is in heaven. 

*References from Ephesians 6:11-12, 1:20, 2:6, Matthew 28:18, Luke 10:19

What is faith?

What is faith?

I think the best way for me to answer this question is to share my understanding, not simply to quote the Bible, or check a dictionary definition. This of course will not be the official or authorized meaning. In other words, I am not claiming to be an authority on faith, or expecting others to accept my view as complete, because I’m sure it isn’t.

I am speaking of faith in the context of the gospel. The gospel, in a nutshell, is the good news that Jesus Christ, God’s son, came to earth to save us by forgiving our sins. Briefly, faith involves believing and accepting this as life-changing fact.

The subject of faith can be very complex. For example, are there increments of faith? Jesus rebuked his disciples for their “little” faith. He also told his followers that if they had faith the size of a mustard seed, then they could command a mountain to be removed and cast into the sea and it would be done.

When you have faith there is evidence. Although faith is invisible, it has an assuring quality. The Bible in the book of Hebrews says “faith is the substance of things hoped for, the evidence of things not seen.” Faith enables us to do things we would not do without it. Scriptural faith is not faith in our own ability, but faith in God.

Faith is very similar to trust. When our son was only two years old he asked us for something and we told him he could have it after two sleeps. He did not ask for the thing again but waited patiently as if it were already his. This was not because he had some concept of possessing enough faith. It was simply because he believed us. He trusted our word. I would not expect another child who does not know us to place the same confidence in us.

The apostle Paul wrote that he counted everything as “dung,” compared to the surpassing value of knowing Christ. To truly know Christ is to have complete, child-like confidence in him. I believe that faith grows out of an intimate understanding of Christ.

People place their confidence in many things, some trustworthy, some not. Seafarers have for centuries used Polaris, the North Star, as a navigation guide. A person who is unaware of its existence will never use it as a compass. Someone who doubts its value for navigation will be unlikely to consult it. The person who believes in its value for navigation will confidently make decisions based on its position.

The apostle Paul comprehended that once he would truly know Christ, his Creator and Saviour, everything in his life would come into alignment. All of his navigation would be accurate.

What do I truly believe about Christ? Am I convinced that I can rely on him? Do I trust him so completely that I align my life with his word?