What does the Bible say about marriage?

I am responding today to an article entitled, Michele Bachmann, Please, Girl, Read Your Dang Bible. Julia Ioffe writes about Michelle Bachmann’s comment on the recent Supreme Court gay marriage ruling in Minnesota. Here is Michelle’s statement as found in Minnesota Reacts to SCOTUS Decision on DOMA:

“Marriage was created by the hand of God. No man, not even a Supreme Court, can undo what a holy God has instituted,” Bachmann said in a statement to the press. “What the Court has done will undermine the best interests of children and the best interests of the United States.”

Julia Ioffe discredits Michelle Bachmann’s statement by telling her she needs to read her Bible and by alluding to stories in the Bible of men, such as Abraham, Jacob, David and Solomon, who had wives and “handmaids” and “concubines.” These accounts are in the Bible. Does this mean that God condones polygamy?

How does God view marriage? I like to think that God is not as complicated as we make him out to be. Yes, we can benefit from the work of theologians who invest their lives in defining the details of theology, but the basics are fairly clear. In the beginning God created Adam and removed a rib from his side and fashioned Eve. He brought her to Adam to be his help-mate. One woman for one man, and God saw that this was “very good.”

God evidently allowed men to have multiple wives but we also see that it wasn’t “very good,” as there was conflict and envy, not only between the wives and mistresses, but jealousy and strife between the children as well. The consequences are woven throughout the historical account and continue today. I concur that it is in the best interests of children to be raised in a home where there are two loving parents, the father and the mother.

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If the Bible is new to you

If the Bible is new to you, there are a couple of things you’ll want to know. Firstly, it is written over centuries by numerous authors but it has a common theme. The separate books were compiled by the second century A.D. Various criteria were used to determine the authenticity and reliability of each text.

The Old Testament

The first half, called the Old Testament, begins with the story of creation. It then goes on to tell many other stories of God’s dealings with mankind. God makes a covenant with Abraham and promises him that he will have numerous descendants and that through him all nations will be blessed. The Old Testament is not shy about showing the raw side of humanity. It is the story of God’s chosen people continually returning to serving idols. This violates the first commandment of the ten commandments God gave to Moses and the nation of Israel, “Thou shalt have no other gods before me.”

The New Testament

The second half, the New Testament, begins with four accounts of the life of Christ. These four books are called the Gospels. They are followed by the book of Acts which tells the story of how the disciples of Jesus Christ started the early church. The remainder of the books expound the teachings of Christ. The book of Revelation is a book of prophesy of the end times and is allegorical. There are also some allegorical books in the Old Testament.

The New Testament is believed to be a fulfillment of the promise of the Old Testament that God would bless many nations through Abraham. The lineage of Jesus, the promised Messiah, or Saviour, can be traced back to Abraham and it is through the coming of Jesus that many nations are blessed. The New Testament teaches that Jesus died on the cross and rose from the dead to pay the penalty of the sins of the world and to offer forgiveness to everyone who receives this gift. This is what is referred to as salvation from sin, or re-birth.

Jesus as Saviour

The Jewish nation, which is descended from Abraham, believed that the prophesied “King,” or Saviour, or Messiah, would deliver them from their enemies. Many refused to acknowledge that Jesus was indeed the Messiah, despite the fact that he fulfilled the prophesies given in the Old Testament concerning him. They expected him to set up a throne on earth, but Jesus spoke of an eternal kingdom. He taught people to love and serve each other, not to triumph over one another.

Jesus also claimed to be the Son of God, and to be equal with God. This was considered blasphemy, by the Jews, a violation of the commandment not to have other gods. By their law he had to be killed and they arrested him and had him crucified.

Three days later Jesus rose from the dead and after many appearances he ascended to heaven. A rumor was spread claiming that the disciples stole his body. However, the Jews had asked specifically that a special guard of Roman soldiers guard the tomb. Their request was granted. The reason they asked for this was because they had heard of Jesus’ claim that he would rise from the dead. So their preventative measures turned out to be futile and made their later stories look rather ludicrous.

Before Jesus ascended to heaven he promised he would return one day and receive those who have chosen him to be their Saviour to be with him forever in an eternal home in heaven.